Laudato Si' Movement

“The urgent challenge to protect our common home includes a concern to bring the whole human family together to seek a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change” (LS 13).

Our Mission

To inspire and mobilize the Catholic community to care for our common home and achieve climate and ecological justice.

Our Name

Laudato Si’ has been and continues to be the cornerstone of our movement, even as the Magisterium of the Church has continued to evolve with texts such as Querida Amazonia and Fratelli Tutti. Laudato Si’ is just one milestone in the long tradition of Catholic Social Teaching, a tradition we embrace wholeheartedly; but Laudato Si’s distinctive theme, “care for our common home,” makes it a milestone that has touched our hearts profoundly and brought us together to advance our mission to care for our imperiled planetary home. In fact, in the spirit of an integral ecology, many of our key initiatives are named after the encyclical: LS Animators, LS Week, LS Circles, LS Generation, LS Retreats, and more. We also humbly acknowledge that there is a lot of Laudato Si’ action taking place outside of our movement, starting with the Vatican’s own Laudato Si’ Action Platform which we actively support together with many others. We are delighted with so much life inspired by the encyclical and Querida Amazonia.

Our Identity

We are a spirit-led movement that brings Catholics together to accomplish our stated mission. The movement brings together a broad range of Catholic organizations and grassroots members from all over the world. These members walk together in synodality and communion with the universal Church on a journey of ecological conversion. Striving for unity in diversity, organizational and grassroots members come together to pray, collaborate and mobilize in response to “the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.” Guided by a spirit of subsidiarity, when the timing and context are right, together they create or engage with local Laudato Si’ Circles and Chapters and connect with the global movement in a wide range of initiatives to bring Laudato Si’ to life.

Our Members

Laudato Si Movement is a hybrid movement. It can be visualized as a tree with two main branches housing its members: (1) Member Organizations and (2) Grassroots Members. Chapters bring together both types of members.

Our Values

Grounded in faith

Our Catholic faith motivates us to act. Laudato Si’ inspires our mission. As followers of Jesus, our decisions are guided by Scriptures and Catholic Social Teaching. We serve the Church by lifting up the integrity of creation and recognizing the value of caring for God’s creation in our faith tradition and our Christian lives.

Committed to spiritual transformation

We commit to “ecological conversion,” the ongoing transformation of our hearts toward greater love with our Creator and creation. We take time to listen to God’s message in creation “with awe and wonder” (LS 11). We reflect on our words and actions, humbly acknowledge where we are falling short, and practice new ways of living simply and in solidarity with creation.

Caring for one another

We cultivate a “culture of care” (LS 231) for one another, ourselves, and all living beings that share our common home. We honor each other’s gifts and limitations. We celebrate our relationships.

Being prophetic

We heed “the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor” (LS 49) by urging ambitious action for ecological and climate justice. We act in solidarity with communities that carry an unjust burden of the ecological crisis, including future generations. We strategically challenge structures of sin and call for “radical change” (LS 171), while being open to dialogue. Our prophetic work is always nonpartisan and nonviolent.

Taking an integral approach

“Everything is connected” (LS 91). We embrace a worldview of integral ecology, which sees ecological, cultural, and social issues as intertwined. We commit to the protection of all human life, from womb to tomb, and to the protection of other species.

Cultivating unity within diversity

We are nourished by the rich diversity of creation and the diversity within the Church, striving for unity in caring for our common home while honoring the unique gifts each individual or organization brings. We live a “spirituality of global solidarity” (LS 240), which unites us for globally-coordinated action that is adapted to local contexts.

Being in the Church and in the world

We serve alongside the whole Catholic family, from the hierarchy to the grassroots, from clergy and religious to the laity. We build relationships between the Church and the environmental movement, being “Christian environmentalists” who are environmentalists among Christians and Christians among environmentalists.

Building bridges

We open space for collaboration between organizations and individuals across borders and regions. We work hand-in-hand with other Christians, other faith communities, and social and environmental movements as a single human family.

Embracing contemplation and action

We are contemplatives, and we are activists. We delight in creation’s song and compassionately respond to creation’s cry. We practice a slow-paced “ecological spirituality” of reflection and prayer, and we practice fast-paced activism to match the urgency of the crisis.

Living in hope

“We know that things can change” (LS 13). With Resurrection joy, we celebrate stories of resilience and life. We rejoice in this ministry as an expression of God’s love in our life and for all creation. We entrust our efforts to the Holy Spirit and Mary Queen of Creation.

Strategic Goals

LSM has three strategic goals which are the guiding stars for all of our efforts to bring Laudato Si’ to life:

1 – Ecological Conversion

To encourage a change of heart of the Catholic faithful and motivate a more passionate concern for our common home, enshrining creation care as a Catholic priority.

2 – Full Sustainability

To help the Catholic community lead by example by embodying the “Less is More” motto and shrinking its footprint to zero, in line with the urgency of the climate and ecological crises.

3 – Prophetic Advocacy

To mobilize the Church to raise a prophetic voice for climate and ecological justice, calling for bold policies to accomplish the Paris Agreement’s goal of 1.5C and halt biodiversity collapse.

Ecological conversion

Sustainability

Advocacy

Our Story

Laudato Si’ Movement was born in 2015

Laudato Si’ Movement was born in 2015 and is the fruit of a kairos – the Greek word used in the Gospel to express “an opportune moment.” The kairos of 2015 was the combination of two transformative events that would shape how the Church and humanity responded to the ecological crisis: the Laudato Si’ encyclical release and the Paris Climate Agreement.
First, Pope Francis wrote and released the encyclical letter “Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home,” the first-ever papal encyclical devoted to the crisis of our planetary home. Inspired by his namesake, St. Francis of Assisi and his deep communion with all Creation (best captured in the Canticle of the Creatures that inspired the encyclical’s title), the Pope issued a powerful appeal to the Church and “all people of good will” to urgently come together and respond to “the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.”

Second, with the backdrop of increasingly starker warnings from the scientific community about the severity of the climate emergency, leaders from nearly 200 nations gathered at the U.N. Paris Climate Summit (COP21) to agree and sign the Paris Agreement. After 21 years of failed negotiations, nations of the world had a deadline to finally agree on a common plan that would tackle the climate crisis before it was too late.

Philippines

Months before those two events (Laudato Si’ was released in June and the Paris Climate Summit took place in December 2015), in the midst of the momentum that was building and the wide media coverage anticipating both events, Laudato Si’ Movement was launched on January 15, 2015, inspired by the Holy Spirit. That was the day Pope Francis arrived in the Philippines for a highly symbolic trip that would feature a visit to Tacloban, the epicenter of the Super Typhoon Haiyan. The disaster killed more than 10,000 people and left 13 million homeless.

Haiyan became a symbol of the climate crisis as it was the strongest storm ever recorded, and scientists explained that it was intensified by climate change. As if emphasizing the urgency of “the signs of the times,” another typhoon hit Tacloban the same day that Pope Francis visited the town (January 17), reminding him and the Church how poor countries like the Philippines are the ones that suffer the most from the unjust climate crisis. The choice of the Philippines for LSM’s foundation has marked the movement’s commitment to hear “the cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor.”

During his Philippines trip, Pope Francis was hosted by Cardinal “Chito” Tagle, who as Archbishop of Manila was LSM’s foundational episcopal sponsor and an essential companion for the journey ahead. The Archdiocese of Manila and some Philippine religious orders were part of the foundational group of 17 organizations and 12 leaders from all continents that came together to form LSM. Soon before, sparked by the momentum of the People’s Climate March of September 2014, the group started gathering in December 2014 through weekly Skype calls to coordinate a united Catholic plan to support the upcoming papal encyclical that was being reported by the press – we didn’t know its name back then! – and raise the voice of the Church to call for climate justice and an ambitious agreement at the Paris Climate Summit.

St. Francis

The founding group chose St. Francis of Assisi as the movement’s patron saint, recalling that he is the patron saint of ecology (it’s worth noting that several Franciscan organizations were LSM founding members), and issued a foundational statement that read:

“The Global Catholic Climate Movement is a first-of-its-kind international coalition of Catholics from many nations, continents, and walks of life. We are laity, religious, and clergy, theologians, scientists, and activists from Argentina, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, Kenya, Australia, the United States, and many other nations. We are united by our Catholic faith and our work in various roles and organizations on climate change issues… Pope Francis will be issuing an encyclical about caring for the environment. With this statement, we the undersigned now seek to help bring these teachings of the Church to the world.”

Climate justice

The first year of LSM was an unexpected explosion of energy and life. The initial group of founding members quickly grew to include 300 Catholic organizations by the end of the year and a vast network of grassroots leaders who coalesced around the goal of supporting the encyclical and mobilizing for an ambitious Paris Climate Agreement. A tiny secretariat, which is the central team supporting the movement, was set up with the support of the Franciscan Action Network. The secretariat initially included Tomás Insua and Christina Leaño, who worked out of university libraries in Boston for the first two years, and Igor Bastos and Fabian Campos, who worked out of Franciscan and Caritas offices, coordinating Latin American efforts.

Petition

Members of the founding Steering Committee had their first in-person gathering in Rome in May 2015, on the occasion of a pre-encyclical preparatory meeting with Vatican officials and Caritas leaders from different continents. The Rome trip included an inspiring encounter with Pope Francis, in which he encouraged the movement to prepare for the upcoming encyclical and shared that he supported the Catholic Climate Petition that LSM had just launched.

As stated in the petition text, LSM’s goal was to push governments to adopt the ambitious goal of limiting global temperature increase to 1.5°C, rather than the less ambitious goal of 2°C that the most polluting nations were backing. Energized by the Laudato Si’ release in June 2015, more than 900,000 Catholics signed LSM petition. The effort was largely driven by the Church in the global south, especially in the Philippines, where Cardinal Tagle helped the petition receive widespread support.

The petition signatures were symbolically carried by Filipino “climate pilgrim” Yeb Saño, a member of LSM’s founding board, from the Vatican to Paris in a prophetic two-month pilgrimage. Saño hand-delivered the signatures in deeply moving interfaith events with the high-level officials who hosted the COP21 summit: French President Francois Hollande and UN climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Eventually, after two weeks of frenetic negotiations and huge pressure from the climate movement, including from the memorable Global Climate March that saw 40,000 Catholics participate, the Vatican and many others, the negotiating block of the poorest nations successfully enshrined the 1.5°C goal in the Paris Agreement. The miracle had happened, “for nothing will be impossible for God” (Luke 1:37). This 1.5°C victory, in which we Catholics had an important role, set an ambitious bar for all climate action to follow.

After the hectic ride of 2015, the following year saw LSM start what have become some of the cornerstones of its holistic approach: the Laudato Si’ Animators formation program, Season of Creation celebrations, prophetic initiatives, such as the fossil fuel divestment campaign, and creative projects that raise awareness about Laudato Si’, such as the providential screening of a Pope video to three million World Youth Day pilgrims at Krakow.

Transforming

In subsequent years, the movement has continued to expand throughout the globe through a growing number of Laudato Si’ Animators, Circles, Chapters and Member Organizations, all of which continue to drive transformative action to care for our common home. In terms of the movement’s structures, the Steering Committee evolved to have co-chairs, Marianne Comfort (Sisters of Mercy) and Christina Leaño, and a formal legal entity and Board of Directors were set up in 2017, chaired by Amy Woolam Echeverria (Columban Missionaries),

following a planning meeting in Assisi with all LSM bodies (which included a new encounter with the Pope). Soon after, the Secretariat’s main office was relocated to Rome to better serve the Church to “live Laudato Si’” by deepening the collaboration with the Vatican and Rome-based Catholic organizations. And in 2019, LSM established an Episcopal Advisory Council with cardinals from different continents who have been accompanying the movement in its journey.

Adapting

The year 2020 was unlike any other for the world and for the movement. At the beginning of the year, on the occasion of the movement’s fifth anniversary, LSM’s leadership and board were humbled and supremely grateful to have a private audience with Pope Francis. The meeting, which also included Cardinal Tagle, served as a beautiful opportunity to thank Pope Francis for his leadership and share the abundant fruits of the first five years of LSM’s journey.

A few months later, the COVID-19 pandemic forced LSM to scrap its plans to organize events to celebrate the fifth anniversary of Laudato Si’ in May. Instead, the movement remained nimble and, along with hundreds of thousands of people on six continents, united online to pray and reflect on how we can build a better world. With strong support from Pope Francis, LSM and its many members and partners hosted “Laudato Si’ Week,” a week’s worth webinars that helped people all over the world honor the world-changing encyclical and prepare for the next five years in our continued prayerful journey for climate justice.

GCCM announces its new name: Laudato Si' Movement

The Global Catholic Climate Movement is now the Laudato Si’ Movement. Below you’ll find everything you need to know about the new name, including stories and videos about the synodal discernment process that led to the change, and congratulatory videos from Laudato Si’ Movement members and friends from all over the world. Laudato Si’!

Our Story

Start

Laudato Si’ Movement was born in 2015

Laudato Si’ Movement was born in 2015 and is the fruit of a kairos – the Greek word used in the Gospel to express “an opportune moment.” The kairos of 2015 was the combination of two transformative events that would shape how the Church and humanity responded to the ecological crisis: the Laudato Si’ encyclical release and the Paris Climate Agreement.
First, Pope Francis wrote and released the encyclical letter “Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home,” the first-ever papal encyclical devoted to the crisis of our planetary home. Inspired by his namesake, St. Francis of Assisi and his deep communion with all Creation (best captured in the Canticle of the Creatures that inspired the encyclical’s title), the Pope issued a powerful appeal to the Church and “all people of good will” to urgently come together and respond to “the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.”

Second, with the backdrop of increasingly starker warnings from the scientific community about the severity of the climate emergency, leaders from nearly 200 nations gathered at the U.N. Paris Climate Summit (COP21) to agree and sign the Paris Agreement. After 21 years of failed negotiations, nations of the world had a deadline to finally agree on a common plan that would tackle the climate crisis before it was too late.

Philippines

Philippines

Months before those two events (Laudato Si’ was released in June and the Paris Climate Summit took place in December 2015), in the midst of the momentum that was building and the wide media coverage anticipating both events, Laudato Si’ Movement was launched on January 15, 2015, inspired by the Holy Spirit. That was the day Pope Francis arrived in the Philippines for a highly symbolic trip that would feature a visit to Tacloban, the epicenter of the Super Typhoon Haiyan. The disaster killed more than 10,000 people and left 13 million homeless.

Haiyan became a symbol of the climate crisis as it was the strongest storm ever recorded, and scientists explained that it was intensified by climate change. As if emphasizing the urgency of “the signs of the times,” another typhoon hit Tacloban the same day that Pope Francis visited the town (January 17), reminding him and the Church how poor countries like the Philippines are the ones that suffer the most from the unjust climate crisis. The choice of the Philippines for LSM’s foundation has marked the movement’s commitment to hear “the cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor.”

During his Philippines trip, Pope Francis was hosted by Cardinal “Chito” Tagle, who as Archbishop of Manila was LSM’s foundational episcopal sponsor and an essential companion for the journey ahead. The Archdiocese of Manila and some Philippine religious orders were part of the foundational group of 17 organizations and 12 leaders from all continents that came together to form LSM. Soon before, sparked by the momentum of the People’s Climate March of September 2014, the group started gathering in December 2014 through weekly Skype calls to coordinate a united Catholic plan to support the upcoming papal encyclical that was being reported by the press – we didn’t know its name back then! – and raise the voice of the Church to call for climate justice and an ambitious agreement at the Paris Climate Summit.

St. Francis

St. Francis

The founding group chose St. Francis of Assisi as the movement’s patron saint, recalling that he is the patron saint of ecology (it’s worth noting that several Franciscan organizations were LSM founding members), and issued a foundational statement that read:

“The Global Catholic Climate Movement is a first-of-its-kind international coalition of Catholics from many nations, continents, and walks of life. We are laity, religious, and clergy, theologians, scientists, and activists from Argentina, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, Kenya, Australia, the United States, and many other nations. We are united by our Catholic faith and our work in various roles and organizations on climate change issues… Pope Francis will be issuing an encyclical about caring for the environment. With this statement, we the undersigned now seek to help bring these teachings of the Church to the world.”

Climate justice

Climate justice

The first year of LSM was an unexpected explosion of energy and life. The initial group of founding members quickly grew to include 300 Catholic organizations by the end of the year and a vast network of grassroots leaders who coalesced around the goal of supporting the encyclical and mobilizing for an ambitious Paris Climate Agreement. A tiny secretariat, which is the central team supporting the movement, was set up with the support of the Franciscan Action Network. The secretariat initially included Tomás Insua and Christina Leaño, who worked out of university libraries in Boston for the first two years, and Igor Bastos and Fabian Campos, who worked out of Franciscan and Caritas offices, coordinating Latin American efforts.

Petition

Petition

Members of the founding Steering Committee had their first in-person gathering in Rome in May 2015, on the occasion of a pre-encyclical preparatory meeting with Vatican officials and Caritas leaders from different continents. The Rome trip included an inspiring encounter with Pope Francis, in which he encouraged the movement to prepare for the upcoming encyclical and shared that he supported the Catholic Climate Petition that LSM had just launched.

As stated in the petition text, LSM’s goal was to push governments to adopt the ambitious goal of limiting global temperature increase to 1.5°C, rather than the less ambitious goal of 2°C that the most polluting nations were backing. Energized by the Laudato Si’ release in June 2015, more than 900,000 Catholics signed LSM petition. The effort was largely driven by the Church in the global south, especially in the Philippines, where Cardinal Tagle helped the petition receive widespread support.

The petition signatures were symbolically carried by Filipino “climate pilgrim” Yeb Saño, a member of LSM’s founding board, from the Vatican to Paris in a prophetic two-month pilgrimage. Saño hand-delivered the signatures in deeply moving interfaith events with the high-level officials who hosted the COP21 summit: French President Francois Hollande and UN climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Eventually, after two weeks of frenetic negotiations and huge pressure from the climate movement, including from the memorable Global Climate March that saw 40,000 Catholics participate, the Vatican and many others, the negotiating block of the poorest nations successfully enshrined the 1.5°C goal in the Paris Agreement. The miracle had happened, “for nothing will be impossible for God” (Luke 1:37). This 1.5°C victory, in which we Catholics had an important role, set an ambitious bar for all climate action to follow.

After the hectic ride of 2015, the following year saw LSM start what have become some of the cornerstones of its holistic approach: the Laudato Si’ Animators formation program, Season of Creation celebrations, prophetic initiatives, such as the fossil fuel divestment campaign, and creative projects that raise awareness about Laudato Si’, such as the providential screening of a Pope video to three million World Youth Day pilgrims at Krakow.

Transforming

Transforming

In subsequent years, the movement has continued to expand throughout the globe through a growing number of Laudato Si’ Animators, Circles, Chapters and Member Organizations, all of which continue to drive transformative action to care for our common home. In terms of the movement’s structures, the Steering Committee evolved to have co-chairs, Marianne Comfort (Sisters of Mercy) and Christina Leaño, and a formal legal entity and Board of Directors were set up in 2017, chaired by Amy Woolam Echeverria (Columban Missionaries),

following a planning meeting in Assisi with all LSM bodies (which included a new encounter with the Pope). Soon after, the Secretariat’s main office was relocated to Rome to better serve the Church to “live Laudato Si’” by deepening the collaboration with the Vatican and Rome-based Catholic organizations. And in 2019, LSM established an Episcopal Advisory Council with cardinals from different continents who have been accompanying the movement in its journey.

Adapting

Adapting

The year 2020 was unlike any other for the world and for the movement. At the beginning of the year, on the occasion of the movement’s fifth anniversary, LSM’s leadership and board were humbled and supremely grateful to have a private audience with Pope Francis. The meeting, which also included Cardinal Tagle, served as a beautiful opportunity to thank Pope Francis for his leadership and share the abundant fruits of the first five years of LSM’s journey.

A few months later, the COVID-19 pandemic forced LSM to scrap its plans to organize events to celebrate the fifth anniversary of Laudato Si’ in May. Instead, the movement remained nimble and, along with hundreds of thousands of people on six continents, united online to pray and reflect on how we can build a better world. With strong support from Pope Francis, LSM and its many members and partners hosted “Laudato Si’ Week,” a week’s worth webinars that helped people all over the world honor the world-changing encyclical and prepare for the next five years in our continued prayerful journey for climate justice.

New Name

New Name

The Global Catholic Climate Movement is now the Laudato Si’ Movement. Below you’ll find everything you need to know about the new name, including stories and videos about the synodal discernment process that led to the change, and congratulatory videos from Laudato Si’ Movement members and friends from all over the world. Laudato Si’!

Learn More

Our Structure

Board of Directors

LSM’s Board of Directors provides direction to the Secretariat, together with the Steering Committee, to ensure mission and vision fulfillment. The Board supports the Secretariat to advance key strategic projects through high-level Church networking as well as provides financial oversight for LSM.

Global Membership Council

LSM’s Global Membership Council supports the Secretariat in developing the Strategic Framework to ensure fidelity to the mission and strategy implementation as it relates to programmatic matters.

Advisory Council

Members of the Advisory Council serve as a public witness of the Church’s commitment to creation care. Members have the opportunity to shape how the global Church can best address the current ecological crisis.

Secretariat

FAQ

 

We are a Catholic Movement, guided by the Holy Spirit, committed to protecting our common home, God’s creation, from the climate emergency and ecological crisis.

To inspire and mobilize the Catholic community to care for our common home and achieve climate and ecological justice.

The Movement is made up of more than 8,000 Laudato Si’ Animators and nearly 900 Member Organizations, present in 115 countries on five continents, and organized into 30 chapters, who work every day to bring Laudato Si’ to life.

  • Ecological conversion: To encourage a change of heart (conversion) of Catholics and motivate a passionate concern for our common home, making care for creation a priority.
  • Total sustainability: To help the Church and its faithful to lead by example, embodying the motto “less is more” and reducing its carbon footprint to zero, in line with the urgency of the climate emergency and ecological crisis.
  • Advocacy: To mobilize the Church to raise its prophetic voice for climate and ecological justice, calling for bold policies to meet the Paris Agreement target of no more than 1.5°C and to stop the biodiversity collapse.

According to the strategic objectives, LSM is working on several programs:

  • Programs for ecological conversion:
    • Laudato Si’ Circles. A global community of small groups that meet regularly to deepen their relationship with God as Creator and with all members of creation.  
    • Laudato Si’ Contemplation Training. A 5-week training, to be introduced to meditation and contemplative practices as a way of prayer
    • Season of Creation. An annual event from September 1 to October 4 to deepen our ecological conversion. 
    • Sustainability programs:
    • Advocacy programs:
      • Biodiversity and Climate Crisis. 
      • Zero Fossil Fuels
        • Divestment
        • Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty
        • Carbon Bombs
      • Regional advocacy campaigns

    Laudato Si’ Movement is registered as a legal entity under U.S. law as a non-profit public charity (501c3).

    LSM is funded by private donors, institutions and individuals who identify with our mission and freely contribute their resources to make our work possible. 

    LSM does not receive any financial support from the Vatican.

    We are a Movement formed mainly by Catholic faithful, lay people, religious and priests, and Organizations that collaborate with the Mission of the Church. 

    We are guided by the Social Doctrine of the Church, its Magisterium and the Holy Scriptures. 

    And, in order to fulfill our mission, we collaborate closely with the different bodies of the Church (dioceses, episcopal conferences, Vatican dicasteries, etc.) in fidelity to the Holy Father and always in a spirit of synodality and listening.

    FAQ

     

    What is LSM?
    We are a Catholic Movement, guided by the Holy Spirit, committed to protecting our common home, God’s creation, from the climate emergency and ecological crisis.
    What is the mission of LSM?
    To inspire and mobilize the Catholic community to care for our common home and achieve climate and ecological justice.
    How is LSM formed?
    The Movement is made up of more than 8,000 Laudato Si’ Animators and nearly 900 Member Organizations, present in 115 countries on five continents, and organized into 30 chapters, who work every day to bring Laudato Si’ to life.
    What are the strategic objectives of LSM?
    • Ecological conversion: To encourage a change of heart (conversion) of Catholics and motivate a passionate concern for our common home, making care for creation a priority.
    • Total sustainability: To help the Church and its faithful to lead by example, embodying the motto “less is more” and reducing its carbon footprint to zero, in line with the urgency of the climate emergency and ecological crisis.
    • Advocacy: To mobilize the Church to raise its prophetic voice for climate and ecological justice, calling for bold policies to meet the Paris Agreement target of no more than 1.5°C and to stop the biodiversity collapse.
    What projects is LSM working on?

    According to the strategic objectives, LSM is working on several programs:

    • Programs for ecological conversion:
      • Laudato Si’ Circles. A global community of small groups that meet regularly to deepen their relationship with God as Creator and with all members of creation.  
      • Laudato Si’ Contemplation Training. A 5-week training, to be introduced to meditation and contemplative practices as a way of prayer
      • Season of Creation. An annual event from September 1 to October 4 to deepen our ecological conversion. 
    • Sustainability programs:
    • Advocacy programs:
      • Biodiversity and Climate Crisis. 
      • Zero Fossil Fuels
        • Divestment
        • Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty
        • Carbon Bombs
      • Regional advocacy campaigns
    What projects is LSM working on?

    Laudato Si’ Movement is registered as a legal entity under U.S. law as a non-profit public charity (501c3).

    How is LSM funded?

    LSM is funded by private donors, institutions and individuals who identify with our mission and freely contribute their resources to make our work possible. 

    LSM does not receive any financial support from the Vatican.

    What is LSM's relationship with the Catholic Church and the Holy See?

    We are a Movement formed mainly by Catholic faithful, lay people, religious and priests, and Organizations that collaborate with the Mission of the Church.

    We are guided by the Social Doctrine of the Church, its Magisterium and the Holy Scriptures.

    And, in order to fulfill our mission, we collaborate closely with the different bodies of the Church (dioceses, episcopal conferences, Vatican dicasteries, etc.) in fidelity to the Holy Father and always in a spirit of synodality and listening.

    Work With Us

    To inspire and mobilize the Catholic community to care for our common home and achieve climate and ecological justice.